Research database

Project information
Project title
Archaeological Deposits in a Changing Climate. In Situ Preservation of Farm Mounds in Northern Norway. Case Varanger, Finnmark
Year
2012/2013
Project leader
Elin Rose Myrvoll, NIKU
Participants
  • Elin Rose Myrvoll, Project manager, Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU)
  • Knut Paasche, Co - manager, NIKU
Participants:
  • Ove Bergersen and Christian Uhlig, Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research (Bioforsk)
  • Keth Lind, Tromsø University Museum, UiT
  • Vibeke Vandrup Martens, NIKU
  • Kjersti Schanche, Sametinget (Cultural heritage management)
  • Elin Rose Myrvoll, Project manager, Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU)
  • Knut Paasche, Co - manager, NIKU
Participants:
  • Ove Bergersen and Christian Uhlig, Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research (Bioforsk)
  • Keth Lind, Tromsø University Museum, UiT
  • Vibeke Vandrup Martens, NIKU
  • Kjersti Schanche, Sametinget (Cultural heritage management)
Flagship

Fjord and Coast, Theme: Capacity for adaptation in indigenous people and local societies

Funding Source
Fram Centre
Summary of Results

Activities 2012:

1. Fieldwork: Choose one archaeological site from Late Stone Age in Varanger

The fieldwork in Varanger was carried out in August and October 2012. In august several sites in Varanger were surveyed by Myrvoll (project leader)  and Schanche  ( cultural heritage management). The site Baŋkgohppi in Unjárgga gielda/Nesseby municipality was chosen for further investigations (fig 1-2). This site was first documented  in 1953 and it consist of 20 house structures from the Stone Age.  Professor Povl Simonsen at Tromsø Museum carried out excavations in four of the house structures  in 1954. In addition to stone artefacts, also bone and antler artefacts, bones from humans, fish and mammals as well as shells were found during the excavations in 1954. A minor excavation also took place at the site in 1975 (fig 3).

All the participating institutions were represented at the field work in Baŋkgohppi in October. We discussed during the field work and project meeting which of the houses at the site that would be most suitable for further investigations and monitoring.  The choice fell on “houses n” which is situated about 14 meters above sea level. “House n” is a typical “Gressbakkenhus” from the last phase of Late Stone Age – probably 4000 years (fig 4-5). The floor area in the house is 3 by 5 meters and two smaller rooms are attached to each short end of the house. The house also has thick cultural layers (midden) alongside the outer wall facing the sea, and that is the most important criterion for choosing this particular house.

Next year our strategy is to carry out a small archaeological excavation in the midden of “House n”. The monitoring equipment will be inserted into the cultural layers from the excavation trench.

2. Apply to the cultural heritage management for permission to conduct a small excavation to evaluate state of preservation, take samples and install monitoring equipment in 2013.

The application to the he cultural heritage management for permission to conduct a small excavation will be finished during December and sent to the Directorate for cultural Heritage, the cultural heritage management at Tromsø Museum, the Sámi Parliament and Finnmark County Administration.

Fig 1 - Archaeological deposits 

 Fig 1: The Baŋkgohppi site in Varanger 

Fig 2 - Archaeological deposits

 Fig 2: The Baŋkgohppi site 

Fig 3 - Archaeological deposits Fig 3: Antler artifact found at the Baŋkgohppi site  

Fig 4 - Archaeological deposits

 Fig 4: "House n" at the Baŋkgohppi  site.  The midden (archaeological deposits) is in the front of the photo

Published Results/Planned Publications

-

Communicated Results

Kick-off meeting in the project  “Archaeological Deposits in a Changing Climate. In Situ Preservation of Farm Mounds in Northern Norway” was held in the Fram Centre in February.

http://www.forskning.no/artikler/2012/februar/313997

Interdisciplinary Cooperation

It would have been impossible to carry out the project without participation from BIOFORSK.

Budget in accordance to results

The funding from the Fram centre is a co-funding of a research project funded by the Research Council of Norway. It would have been impossible to carry out the Varanger case without the funding from the Fram Centre. This year's funding from the Fram Centre was sufficient in relation to the planned activities.  

Could results from the project be subject for any commercial utilization
No
Conclusions
  1. In accordance with the project application the planned activities in 2013 and 2014 are as follows:

 Activities in  2013:

  • A minor excavation and documentation of the archaeological deposits where the monitoring equipment will be installed. Equipment will be redox/multi probes.
  • Preservation of archaeological finds
  • Workshop linking natural and social scientists to synthesize current work and plan the final year's work

2014:

  • Collection of research data, and laboratory work
  • Meeting to present results to public and other stakeholders, including representatives of theregional cultural heritage management at Sametinget and Finnmark county
  • Writing articles and discussion of possible museum exhibit based on findings (funding would be requested from Fram incentive money and/or outreach office)
  1. The project will develop an interdisciplinary method to obtain a sustainable in situ management of cultural heritage as expressed in the archaeological deposits, by the identification of the environmental and societal parameters affecting the present conservation state and conditions for future preservation of archaeological deposits, particularly in the unsaturated zone.