Research database

Project information
Keywords
Biodiversity, climate indicator species, ecology, physiology, sea ice biology
Project title
Ice-Free Arctic Ocean: Dead end or new opportunities for biodiversity and habitat Expansion (FADE)
Year
2019
Project leader
Janne E. Søreide
Geographical localization of the research project in decimal degrees (max 5 per project, ex. 70,662°N and 23,707°E)
N-Ice drift from February to June 2015, North of Svalbard (80.5°-83.2°N, 05.1°-25.5°E) Nansen Legacy transect, Northern Barents Sea (75.5-83.3°N, 31-34°E) MOSAiC transpolar drift 2019-2020 Storfjorden/Inglefieldbukta 77.899°N, 18.301°E and Van Mijenfjorden 77.854°N, 16.738°E
Participants

 

·         The University Centre in Svalbard, project leader: Janne E. Søreide (janne.soreide@unis.no), Anna    Vader

 

·         Norwegian Polar institute (NPI); Haakon Hop (haakon.hop@npolar.no ), Anette Wold

 

·         UiT the Arctic University of Norway (UiT): Malin Daase (malin.daase@uit.no), Rolf Gradinger

 

·         Other national partners: Marvin Choquet, Nord University, Norway

 

·         International partners: Ksenia Kosobokova; Shirshov Institute of Oceanology Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia, Gerald Darnis, Université Laval, Québec, Canada; Barbara Niehoff, Alfred Wegener Institute, Bremerhaven, Germany

 

·    Administrative responsible: Harald Ellingsen (Harald.Ellingsen@unis.no)

 

Flagship
Arctic Ocean
Funding Source

Project partners contribute with ca 3 weeks salary in kind every year. The project data has been collected thorugh several smaller and  larger field campaigns which have been funded through other projects.

Summary of Results

 

Project started this year and it is a 3 years project if funding is provided also in 2020 and 2021.

Project kickoff meeting at 21.03.2019 where priorities were made for 2019. Project is going according to plan, with one exception: our July cruise to the Arctic Ocean North of Svalbard with RV Kronprins Haakon got cancelled only 2 weeks prior to departure due to damages on the ship. Several of the project partners planned to go on that cruise:  Malin Daase, Janne E. Søreide, Gerald Darnis and Marvin Choquet. This cancellation has made to some budget changes. Now most 2019 funding goes to analyses of already excisting samples and personnell to analyse and write up excisting data and to publish student theses work. 

 

Results so far:

 

Two master students have successfully defended their theses on sympagic meiofauna (with best grade possible) and they are currently writing their theses into papers for publications.

 

Main results: In Van Mijenfjorden, 13 metazoan taxa were identified from the ice and 15 taxa from the water column with low abundances of dominant ice fauna in the water samples. Total sympagic metazoan abundance peaked in late April with over 25,000 ind m-2, due to the reproduction of ice-associated nematodes.

 

Molecular analysis indicated the presence of two polychaete species not yet considered to be sympagic, Melaenis loveni and a Spio sp., and at least two nematode species not priory described from Svalbard sea ice. The finding of M. loveni challenges the presumption of Scolelepis squamata as the resident sympagic polychaete in Svalbard. The nematodes collected in this study likely provide the first molecular evidence for Theristus melnikovi and possibly the first sign of an Arctic sympagic species within the genus Halomonhystera.

 

One PhD student submitted her thesis this September with tentative defense date 20.11.2019. She is the lead author on one FADE manuscript there Calanus data from N-Ice and Isfjorden is compared. We aim to submit this manuscript by the end of the year.

 

Main results:

 

Adult males and females of C. glacialis appeared as early as December-January, up to two months earlier than in C. finmarchicus, with a corresponding 1 month earlier peak in recruitment for C. glacialis. The seasonal regulation of anabolic and catabolic enzyme activities were overall similar for the two species, but with some ontogenetic species specific differences. Wake-up from overwintering and reproduction started earlier in adults of C. glacialis than C. finmarchicus, and onset of dormancy earlier for the overwintering stages of both species. Furthermore, C. glacialis was found to be more specialized in efficiently building up lipids, as reflected by an earlier and higher mobilization of lipase enzyme activities.

FADE prioritize to write up already existing data in 2019 and molecular analyses of N-Ice zooplankton samples is the next priority.

 

Master and PhD-students involved in the project

Vanessa Pitusi (MSc)

Magnus H. Andreasen (MSc)

Maja K. Hatlebakk (PhD)

For the Management

Will be adressed in the annual report in January 2020 and not in this first year progress report.

Published Results/Planned Publications

MSc theses:

 

Pitusi V (2019) Seasonal abundance and activity of sympagic meiofauna in Van Mijenfjorden, Svalbard. MSc thesis, UiT the Arctic University of Norway and the University Centre in Svalbard, 75 pp. Super visors: Rolf Gradinger (UiT) and Janne E. Søreide (UNIS)

 

 

 

Andreasen MH (2019) Community composition, population structure and phylogeny of coastal sympagic meiofauna in eastern Svalbard. University of Bergen and the University Centre in Svalbard. Supervisors Lise Øveråd (UiB) and Janne E. Søreide (UNIS)

 

 

 

PhD thesis

 

Hatlebakk MK (2019) New insights into Calanus glacialis and C. finmarchicus distributions, life histories and physiology in high-latitude seas. PhD thesis, Nord University and the University Centre in Svalbard.

Talks

 

Hop H, Wold A, Søreide JE, Hatlebakk MKV, Meyer A, Vihtakari  M, Bailey A, Assmy P, Mundy CJ  (2019) Zooplankton ascent and reproduction below drifting sea ice after winter in the Arctic Ocean. 

 

Wold A, Hop H, Søreide JE, Hatlebakk MKV, Meyer A, Vihtakari M, Bailey A (2019) Awakening of zooplankton below drifting sea ice after a dark winter in the Arctic Ocean. IMBER, June 2019.

 

 

 

Manuscripts prepared 2019

 

Wold A, Hop H, Søreide JE, Hatlebakk MKV, Meyer A, Vihtakari M, Bailey A (in prep) Awakening of zooplankton below drifting sea ice after a dark winter in the Arctic Ocean.

 

Hatlebakk M, Niehoff B, Eide H, Daase M, Choquet M, Hoarau G, Søreide JE. (in prep)
Seasonal changes in population dynamics and enzyme activity of C. glacialis and C. finmarchicus in the high Arctic. Manuscript (submitted as part of PhD thesis to Hatlebakk).

 

Choquet M, Burckard G, Skreslet S, Hoarau G, Søreide JE (in prep.)No evidence for hybridization between Calanus finmarchicus and C. glacialis in sympatric areas. Published as part of Choquet’s PhD thesis

 

  

 

Communicated Results

See above. In addition, the work has been extenively communicted in UNIS regular student courses.

Interdisciplinary Cooperation

 

Yes between “traditional” and molecular biologists which make it possible to reveal species identity of sympagic meiofauna which is poorly known and to correctly species identify Calanus – regarded as important climate indicator species

 

Budget in accordance to results

Project is going according to plan, with one exception: our July cruise to the Arctic Ocean North of Svalbard with RV Kronprins Haakon got cancelled only 2 weeks prior to departure due to damages on the ship. Several of the project partners planned to go on that cruise:  Malin Daase, Janne E. Søreide, Gerald Darnis and Marvin Choquet. This cancellation has made to some budget changes. Now most 2019 funding goes to analyses of already excisting samples and personnell to analyse and write up excisting data and to publish student theses work. 

Could results from the project be subject for any commercial utilization
No
Conclusions

One deviations from the original project plan; cancellation of the July cruise with RV Kronprins Haakon. Otherwise the project proceed according to plan with main focus on analyse already collected samples and to write up excisting data for publications.